Numbers In Korean

If you want to learn Korean numbers, then you’ve come to the right place. On this page we will teach you Korean numbers and everything you need to know to count in Korean.

If you didn’t know, Korean actually has two counting systems. These are known as Sino-Korean Numbers and Native Korean Numbers and they are used in different situations.

On this page we will teach you both Sino-Korean and Native Korean numbers and the situations in which you would use the different number systems.

The Korean numbers on this page are written using Korean characters. If you don’t know how to read the Korean alphabet yet, don’t worry. We have a complete Korean Alphabet lesson to help you learn how to read in Korean.

First let’s start with Sino-Korean numbers as these are the easiest to learn and used most often.

Sino-Korean Numbers

Sino-Korean numbers are used for money, dates, phone numbersaddresses, minutes and numbers above 100. Sino-Korean numbers are really easy to learn. Once you learn the first 10 numbers, you can easily count to 99 in Korean.

Numbers 1 to 10

1 to 10 in Sino-Korean Numbers are:

1 – / 2 – / 3 – / 4 – / 5 – / 6 – / 7 – / 8 – / 9 – / 10 –

Try to read each number out loud and then play the audio files below to see how to pronounce these numbers.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Numbers 1 to 100

Once you have memorized the first 10 numbers, you only need to know one more word to be able to count to 100 in Korean. This word is which means 100 in Korean.

100

You can now say any number between 1 and 100 by simply combining the numbers you have just learned.

For example, to make 11 we simply say 10 (십) followed by 1 (일) = 십일 (11). To say 12 we simply put together 10 (십) followed by 2 (이) = 십이 (12). Easy right?

This is the same up to 십구 (19). Can you guess how to say 20 in Korean? To say 20 we simply put together 이 (2) and 십 (10) to make 이십 (20). You can think of it as 2×10=20. And, this is the same for 30 (삼십), 40 (사십), 50 (오십), 60 (육십), 70 (칠십), 80 (팔십), and 90 (구십). And then to say 100 we use the word 백.

Armed with this knowledge you should be able to say any number between 1 and 100 in Korean. For example, 21 would be 이 (2)십(10)일(1) = 이십일. 35 would be 삼십오. 97 would be 구십칠.

Let’s try! Use the practice exercise below to practice saying numbers between 1 and 100. Look at the numbers and try to say it in Korean. Then click on the answer tab to see the answer.

Practice Exercise

15

십오

25

이십오

85

팔십오

17

십칠

47

사십칠

97

구십칠

52

오십이

28

이십팔

69

육십구

100

Numbers 100 to 10,000

Now that you can count to 100 in Korean, you only need to know two more words to count to 10,000 in Korean. These are 천 (thousand) and 만 (ten thousand).

1000

10,000

To say any number between 100 and 10,000 simply combine the numbers you have already learned. For example, to say nine thousand we simply say 구 (nine) 천 (thousand) – 구천 (9000). 

To say nine thousand nine hundred we say 구 (nine) 천 (thousand) 구 (nine) 백 (hundred) – 구천구백 (9900). 

To say nine thousand nine hundred and eighty we say 구 (nine) 천 (thousand) 구 (nine) 백 (hundred) 팔(eight) 십 (ten) – 구천구백팔십 (9980). 

To say nine thousand nine hundred and eighty seven we say 구 (nine) 천 (thousand) 구 (nine) 백 (hundred) 팔(eight) 십 (ten) 칠 (seven) – 구천구백팔십칠 (987). 

Your turn! Use the practice exercise below to practice saying numbers between 100 and 10,000. Look at the number and try to say it in Korean. Then click on the answer tab to see the answer.

Practice Exercise

2000

이천

2200

이천이백

2220

이천이백이십

2222

이천이백이십이

3400

삼천사백

6055

육천오십오

1001

천일

8961

팔천구백육십일

10,000

Numbers 10,000 to 1 Billion

Korean numbers higher than 10,000 start to get a bit difficult for English speakers. Not because the words are difficult, but rather the number system is a little different to what they are used to.

Korean numbers between 10,000 (ten thousand) and 100,000,000 (one hundred million) are counted in increments of 10,000. So, where as in English you would say 100,000 as “one hundred thousand”, in Korean we would say “십만” which means 10(십) x 10,000(만). 

Numbers from 100,000,000 (one hundred million) and above are counted in increments of one hundred million. 100,000,000 is 억 in Korean.

As you have already learned the numbers to count from 1 to 10,000, you only need to learn six more words to be able to count to 1 billion in Korean. These are:

10,000 만 / 100,000 십만 / 1,000,000 (million) 백만 / 10,000,000 (10 million) 천만 / 100,000,000 (100 million) 일억 /  1,000,000,000 (billion) 십억

Try to read each word in Korean and then click on the audio below to listen how it should sound.

10,000

(ten thousand)

십만

100,000

(hundred thousand)

백만

1,000,000

(million)

천만

10,000,000

(ten million)

100,000,000

(one hundred million)

십억

1,000,000,000

(billion)

Congratulations! You have now learned all the numbers you need to know to count to 1 billion in Korean. Obviously it will take time and practice to master Korean numbers, but if you memorize the following 18 words you’ll be able to make any number using Sino-Korean Numbers:

1 – / 2 – / 3 – / 4 – / 5 – / 6 – / 7 – / 8 – / 9 – / 10 –

100 – / 1000 – / 10,000 – / 100,000 – 십만 / 1,000,000 – 백만 / 10,000,000 – 천만

100,000,000 – / 1,000,000,000 – 십억

Native Korean Numbers

Next, let’s look at the other Korean number system which is native Korean numbers.

The first thing to know about native Korean numbers is that they only go up to 99. For any number higher than that, Sino-Korean numbers are use.

Native Korean numbers are only used for certain things. Native Korean numbers are used for age, counting things, counting people, and for just counting. If you’ve ever seen a Korean person taking a photograph you’ve probably heard them count to 3 before taking the picture by saying “하나, 둘 , 셋”.

To tell the time in Korean, both native Korean numbers (for hours) and Sino-Korean numbers (for minutes) are used. So, it is important to learn both number systems to talk about time, age, and counting things in Korean.

Let’s first learn numbers 1 to 10 in native Korean numbers.

Numbers 1 to 10

The first 10 native Korean numbers are:

1 – 하나 / 2 – / 3 – / 4 – / 5 – 다섯 / 6 – 여섯 / 7 – 일곱 / 8 – 여덟 / 9 – 아홉 / 10 –

Try to read each number out loud and then listen to the audio below to see how it should sound.

하나

1

2

3

4

다섯

5

여섯

6

일곱

7

여덟

8

아홉

9

10

Now that you know the first ten native Korean numbers, counting to 19 is really easy. Again, just like Sino-Korean numbers, you simply combine the numbers you have just learned. To say 11 simply put together 열 (10) and 하나 (1) to make 열하나 (11). To say 12 simply put together 열 (10) and 둘 (2) to make 열둘 (12). This is the same up to number 19.

Numbers 20-99

Unlike Sino-Korean numbers, numbers 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, and 90 have their own special word. Once you learn these words you can then easily say any Native Korean number between 1 and 99.

Let’s learn these numbers. Try to read each number out loud and then click on the audio to see how it should sound.

10

스물

20

서른

30

마흔

40

50

예순

60

일흔

70

여든

80

아흔

90

축하해요! Congratulations!

You have now learned all the native Korean numbers you need to know to count to 99. To say any number simply combine the numbers you have just learned. For example, to say 35 simply put together 서른 (30) and 다섯 (5) to make 서른다섯 (35). To make 99 simply put together 아흔 (90) and 아홉 (9) to make 아흔아홉 (99). Easy right?

Your turn, try the practice exercise below. Try to say each number out loud. Then click on the answer tab to see if you were correct.

Practice Exercise

13

열셋

28

스물여덟

31

서른하나

47

마흔일곱

52

쉰둘

64

예순넷

75

일흔다섯

86

여든여섯

97

아흔일곱

19

열아홉

23

스물셋

38

서른여덟

I hope you found this lesson about numbers in Korean useful. If you would like to practice some more you can download some flashcards and a Korean numbers list below.

Ready to study more Korean language? Check out LK24’s Korean Vocabulary pages and Korean lesson pages to expand your vocabulary and learn useful Korean phrases and grammar.